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Posting links about analytics, media, web, gadgets, technology, videos, travel, food and the occasional picture.

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April 24, 2012 at 11:10pm

This thing works!  
I’m starting to see how often sites send alerts out throughout the day, but it’s most interesting when there’s a single event that everyone is alerting their users of.  For five primaries that apparently didn’t matter - there were a total of 23 breaking news alerts were sent out from seven news outlets.  For some, it was a minute by minute approach, where others waited until all the action ended before sending out an alert.  Here’s how it broke down:
FoxNews - First to alert @ 8:21, total of 5 alertsMSNBC - Tied for second to alert 8:24, total of 4 alertsPolitico - Tied for second to alert @ 8:24, total of 5 alertsThe Washington Post -  Next to alert @ 8:36, total of 4 alertsLA Times - went with one wrap up alert @ 9:11USA Today - also went with one alert but much later @ 9:40WSJ - similar strategy to USAT and LA Times but late to the party @ 9:45

This thing works!  

I’m starting to see how often sites send alerts out throughout the day, but it’s most interesting when there’s a single event that everyone is alerting their users of.  For five primaries that apparently didn’t matter - there were a total of 23 breaking news alerts were sent out from seven news outlets.  For some, it was a minute by minute approach, where others waited until all the action ended before sending out an alert.  Here’s how it broke down:

FoxNews - First to alert @ 8:21, total of 5 alerts
MSNBC - Tied for second to alert 8:24, total of 4 alerts
Politico - Tied for second to alert @ 8:24, total of 5 alerts
The Washington Post -  Next to alert @ 8:36, total of 4 alerts
LA Times - went with one wrap up alert @ 9:11
USA Today - also went with one alert but much later @ 9:40
WSJ - similar strategy to USAT and LA Times but late to the party @ 9:45

April 21, 2012 at 9:19pm

Tracking Breaking News Alerts

At work, I often hear how competitive it is to break news before other sources.  We’ve always wanted to log and automate it for competitive reasons.  It’s been hard to automate until recently thanks to the help of one of my favorite sites IFTTT.  Only one day of alerts in it so far, but very cool to see all the breaking news alerts visualized on a calendar, what news orgs alert which events, and how fast they are to alert.

I can’t wait until there’s a month worth of alerts.  Should be interested to see if we can glean any knowledge from this.  Below is a screen grab from my google calendar of the first day of news alerts.  So far I’m tracking: The Washington Post, NY Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, LA Times, Fox News and a few local news stations…

Day 1 of alerts

How To: 

Step 1: Subscribe to an an insane number of news alerts from all your favorite publishers.

Step 2: In IFTTT Create a Gmail channel and a Google Calendar channel with the name of the calendar that you want to publish to.

Step 3: Create a filter in Gmail that auto-labels (and skips inbox if you want to preserve your sanity): 

image

Step 4: Use my IFTTT recipe to push all of the emails with that filter to your Google Calendar. https://ifttt.com/recipes/101057

Step 5: Watch all the #breakingnews alerts start populating you calendar.

Or skip all this, and just look at this: Google Calendar for News Alerts

May 19, 2011 at 11:04am

Facebook Doc: Working together to build social news

Working Together to Build Social News

May 9, 2011 at 11:29am

via Journalism.org

In other words, the Drudge Report’s influence cuts across both traditional organizations such as ABC News to more tabloid style outlets such as the New York Post. What’s more, Drudge Report drove more links than Facebook or Twitter on all the sites to which it drove traffic.

This isn’t exactly true - but pretty amazing how much power a 1 page website has.

via Journalism.org

In other words, the Drudge Report’s influence cuts across both traditional organizations such as ABC News to more tabloid style outlets such as the New York Post. What’s more, Drudge Report drove more links than Facebook or Twitter on all the sites to which it drove traffic.

This isn’t exactly true - but pretty amazing how much power a 1 page website has.

May 6, 2011 at 3:00pm

via Hitwise blog
It certainly has been a wild 60 days or so since the launch of our redesigned site (with new CMS).  Major events like the Japan Earthquake, Royal Wedding and now Osama bin Laden have been making our traffic break previous single day records.  
This Hitwise blog shows that all news outlets took advantage of the event:

via Hitwise blog

It certainly has been a wild 60 days or so since the launch of our redesigned site (with new CMS).  Major events like the Japan Earthquake, Royal Wedding and now Osama bin Laden have been making our traffic break previous single day records.  

This Hitwise blog shows that all news outlets took advantage of the event:

March 23, 2011 at 8:58am

Digital Subscription Prices Visualized (aka The New York Times Is Delusional)

Digital Subscription Prices Visualized (aka The New York Times Is Delusional)

May 17, 2010 at 10:24am

Future of news «  BuzzMachine

Jeff Jarvis seems spot on with where news is going to go…

March 8, 2010 at 5:54pm

Mediagazer is to Media as Techmeme is to Tech - Techmeme News →

umm…awesome!

February 23, 2010 at 2:20pm

City Paper’s Wemple Will Edit Allbritton’s DC Local News Startup City Paper’s Wemple Will Edit Allbritton’s DC Local News Startup | paidContent  →

[Erik] Wemple, the high-profile editor of alt-weekly Washington City Paper for the last eight years, will be the new enterprise’s editor, reporting to Brady, president of digital strategy for Allbritton Communications. Brady promises to announce the name of the new outlet in early March.

February 22, 2010 at 12:09pm

Video @ paidContent 2010: New York Times Execs On Metered News And More | paidContent

Sulzberger insisted the new model isn’t intended to choke off traffic and new users, while Nisenholtz said the challenge is creating a model that charges while growing advertising—and Robinson tried very hard to convince people a meter isn’t a paywall. The Q&A includes exchanges with The Guardian’s Emily Bell; Slate’s Jacob Weisberg and Reuters’ Felix Salmon.